An Age By Age Guide To Feeding Your Baby

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September 27, 2017

An Age By Age Guide To Feeding Your Baby

An Age By Age Guide To Feeding Your Baby

Having a baby is a very interesting thing. It’s a wonderful experience but can be a draining experience for you and your family. You’re taking on new things, getting to know somethings you might not have considered before.

As a mother of a newborn baby, feeding your baby is probably the toughest task for you. You’re wondering what to feed them, how much to feed them and often find yourself clueless.

Well, let me assure, you don’t have to worry about a thing because it’s nothing new and most of us have gone through this as well. As a mother of two children myself, I had my share of problems when it came to feeding my children.

But now I am putting this guide together just so that you don’t have to worry about a thing. Be forewarned though, this is just a guide and feeding your children is totally your own choice and what foods can be intro-duced at what age is no exception.

Let’s see, this guide says that introduce tofu to your baby at 6 months but it’s totally up to you if you want to do that earlier. Similarly, if you want to introduce new foods in any order it’s totally up to you.

Watch this interesting video on how to introduce new foods to your baby.

From Birth to 4 months

Feeding behavior

Rooting reflex is responsible to turn your baby towards a nipple to find nourishment.

What to feed

Milk: Breast milk or formula only

Feeding tip

As a newborn, your baby does not have a digestive track - it’s developing so no solid food.

From 4 to 6 months

When is your baby ready for solid food?

Here’s a respective guide or checklist to follow and see if your baby is ready for solid food.

  • Is able to hold their head up and sit straight.
  • Weighs at least 13 pounds or more.
  • Able to close mouth around a spoon
  • Able to move food from front to back of mouth

What to feed

  • Milk
  • Vegetables preferably pureed
  • Fruits also pureed
  • Meat pureed
  • Cereal
  • Small amounts of yogurt

How much per day

  • You can start by just introducing 1 teaspoon of pureed food and cereal with breast milk.
  • Twice a day
  • Increase intake gradually

Feeding tips

  • If your baby won't eat what you offer, no problem. Try again in a few days
  • Introduce new food one at a time. Let them get used to one before trying on another food item.

Age: 6 to 8 months

Readiness for solid food?

Same as 4 to 6 months

What to feed

  • Milk
  • Pureed or strained fruits
  • Pureed or strained vegetables (well-cooked carrots, squash, sweet potato)
  • Pureed meat (chicken, pork, beef)
  • Pureed tofu
  • Pureed legumes (black beans, chickpeas, edamame, fava beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, kidney beans)
  • Iron-fortified cereal (oats, barley)

How much per day

  • You can start by increasing intake to 2 or 3 tablespoons in four feedings
  • From 1 teaspoon of vegetables, gradually increased to 2 or 3 tablespoons in four feedings
  • 3 to 9 tablespoons cereal in 2 or 3 feedings

Feeding tips

  • If your baby won't eat what you offer, no problem. Try again in a few days
  • Introduce new food one at a time. Let them get used to one before trying on another food item.

Age: 8 to 10 months

Readiness for solid food

  • Mostly same as above
  • Is able to pick up things
  • Can move objects between hands
  • Able to put everything in their mouth
  • Able to move jaw

What to feed

  • Milk
  • Soft pasteurized cheese, cottage cheese, and un
  • sweetened yogurt - small amounts
  • Vegetables - Mashed (cooked carrots, squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes)
  • Fruits - ashed(bananas peaches, pears, avocados)
  • Protein (meat, poultry, boneless fish, tofu, and well-cooked beans, like lentils, split peas, pintos, or black beans)
  • Cereal with fortified iron (barley, wheat, oats,mixed cereals

How much per day

  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 ounce cheese)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal
  • 3/4 to 1 cup fruit
  • 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons protein-rich food

Age: 10 to 12 months

Readiness for solid food

  • Same before, also
  • Able to swallow more food
  • Teeth
  • Attempts to use a spoon

What to feed

  • Milk
  • Pasteurized cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese (no cow's milk until age 1)
  • Mashed fruit or strips
  • Vegetables cut into bite size pieces (peas, carrots)
  • Protein (meat, poultry, boneless fish, tofu, and well-cooked beans)
  • Finger foods (O-shaped cereal, small bits of scrambled eggs, well-cooked pieces of potato, well-cooked
  • spiral pasta, teething crackers, small pieces of bagel)

How much per day

  • 1/3 cup dairy (or 1/2 ounce cheese)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup iron-fortified cereal
  • 3/4 to 1 cup fruit
  • 3/4 to 1 cup vegetables
  • 1/8 to 1/4 cup combo foods
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons protein-rich food

Feeding tip

Introduce new foods one at a time.




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